Antarctic Fox
The log of Rachel and Kevin Fox's trip to the Antarctic Peninsula in the Summer of 2008-9
Day 2: Leopard
December 27 - Murray Harbor, in the Antarctic Peninsula

There are five main species of seal on the Antarctic Peninsula, but one of rarest and most interesting is the leopard seal. Unlike other Antarctic seals that subsist primarily on krill, fish, or squid, the leopard seal's diet consists primarily of penguins. Its long, serpentine body is built for speed and agility, and its mouth is fixed in a smile looking simultaneously content, menacing, and mesozoic.

On a typical week-long expedition, a group is lucky to see one or two leopard seals, and many trips go by without seeing any at all. Imagine our surprise at not only coming across a leopard resting on some floating ice in the harbor, but in coming close enough to get pictures like these:

I Am Leopard Seal

I Am Leopard Seal - Beautiful and Dangerous - this leopard seal is a major predator in Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Leopard Seal Drive By - Our first encounter with a leopard seal. Sorry for the shaky camera-work. My first time shooting video from the zodiac. Commentary from our naturalist, Rob McCallum - Video by Kevin Fox
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Up Close And Personal

Up Close And Personal - The other zodiac full of our group getting up close and personal with this predator of Antarctica the leopard seal. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Observing The Leopard

Observing The Leopard - We were able to get very close to this Leopard seal, one of the main predators of Antarctica. This is the the other zodiac with half our group observing this seal very closely. [Ingrid, Patricia, Noah, Tim, Daveen, Alan, Heather] - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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You Called?

You Called? - This leopard seal is sizing us up to see if we are a threat or whether he can go back to his nap. He went back to his nap! - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Got An Itch

Got An Itch - A leopard seal resting on an ice floe in Murray Harbor, Antarctica. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Stretch

Stretch - A Leopard seal, the hunters of Antarctica. We got to get very close to this one resting on a small ice flow. While not a predator of humans Rob and Tim (our guides) pointed out that you still never turn your back on a leopard seal! - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Antarctic Serpent

Antarctic Serpent - A leopard seal resting on an ice floe in Murray Harbor, Antarctica. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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As we slowly circled the ice, the seal would occasionally look up to see what we were up to, then stretch back down and close its eyes, occasionally stretching its tail out or scratching its belly just like a person. Concerned at how close we were, I asked about the dangers they pose to people and Rob reassured us that they're not aggressive to humans, that attacks almost never happen, and when they do it's always a misunderstanding. Like the woman who was snorkeling when a leopard dragged her down several hundred feet and drowned her, or the handful of times that leopard seals have jumped out of the water to nip at the ankles of people it mistook for penguins from under the water. These assurances didn't make me feel more comfortable circling within sneezing distance of the leopard, but on the other hand it pretty clearly wasn't agitated.

Progressing on from the leopard seal, we landed on a beach with three lounging weddell seals. Unlike the leopard seal, weddells rely on a very thick layer of fat to keep them warm. If you were to x-ray such a seal, you'd find a huge bag of insulation with a relatively small animal tucked inside of it. They're indifferent-to-curious around people, and have small cute heads compared to the rest of their bodies.

We went up on the ice pack you see below to get a better view of them and had our first experience watching out for, and stepping over, hidden crevasses in the ice. In a pack this small a fall wouldn't be very dangerous, but it's good practice to look for the subtle disturbances in the snow that indicate that it's just a top layer over empty space.

Wheddell Landing

Wheddell Landing - Heading in to join the rest of our group on this island observing some lounging Weddell seals. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Lazy Day

Lazy Day - A relaxing Weddell seal in Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Jacques Brain

Jacques Brain - Brian surveying this amazing land of Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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The Slopes

The Slopes - The light playing on this snowy mountain in Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Glacial Cracks

Glacial Cracks - Crevasses and stripes in the face of this glacier. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Little Reflections

Little Reflections - An island in Murray harbor, Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Itchy Nose

Itchy Nose - A beautiful Weddell seal resting and itching on the snow. Either that or it's a seal sobriety test. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Antarctica In Her Eyes

Antarctica In Her Eyes - Rachel enjoying Antarctica. The world as she sees it is reflected in her glasses. The person in the left lens looking at Rachel is Tim Soper. I'm in the right lens taking the photo. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Snow Fun

Snow Fun - Heather sliding down a little hill on an island in Murray harbor, Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Our weather, as would be usual, was just beautiful.

Serenity

Serenity - "We gazed with feelings of indescribable delight upon a scene of grandeur and magnificence far beyond anything we had before seen or could have conceived." - Captain James Clark Ross -- Patricia relaxing on the rocks of an island somewhere in Murray harbor. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Got An Itch

Got An Itch - A Weddell seal relaxing on the ice and giving his tummy a little scratch. He does actually have little finger nails on his flippers. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Explorers

Explorers - The other zodiac full of friends and family speeding off to see yet another wonder. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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After leaving the seals, we spent a bit of time just exploring some of the older growlers and bergy bits floating in the harbor. Because they had been in the water for months or longer, melting and turning and melting some more, there were some fantastic shapes and colors. One of my favorites was a small softball-sized piece of solid ice, sitting black in the water until I lifted it out to take back to the boat.

The ice in the water comes about in many different ways. Some freezes on the sea and is frozen saltwater, others are packs of snow that have fallen and joined glaciers, or even snow that has fallen on existing icebergs as they float around the sea. Clear ice always means one thing though: very old glacial ice that fell long enough ago that it was covered by tons of later snowfalls until, in the bowels of the glacier, it gets compressed into solid, clear ice. Ice that goes through this process is typically over a thousand years old, and I plucked a chunk of it out of the water and brought it back to the boat to keep my drink cold. Time really does have a different meaning out here.

Kevin's Rock

Kevin's Rock - A clear piece of ice made of freshwater that was in a glacier once. Or maybe Kevin just found me a very big melting diamond! ;) - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Snow Slide

Snow Slide - Its views like this that are beautiful, amazing and rather scary as well! - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Ice Window

Ice Window - Eroding ice berg framing the folds of a glacier still intact but buckling and soon to add more ice bergs to the icy water. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Hello Fellow Explorers

Hello Fellow Explorers - The other half of our exploration crew. Noah, Patricia, Heather, Tim, Alan, Daveen (hidden) and Ingrid. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Drip

Drip - The edge of a ice berg in Antarctica. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Rhino

Rhino - "Swans of weird shape pecked at our planks, a gondola steered by a giraffe ran foul of us, which much amused a duck sitting on a crocodile’s head... All the strange fantastic shapes rose and fell in stately cadence with a rustling, whispering sound and hollow echoes to the thudding seas." -Frank Worsley, captain of Endurance, describing ice - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Like Skin

Like Skin - Beautiful texture on the side of an ice berg - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Shake

Shake - An Antarctic or Blue-eyed shag shaking water from its head. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Fly By

Fly By - A kelp gull gliding around the ice. - Photo by Kevin Fox
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Cracking

Cracking - Textures of cracking in the edge of a glacier. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Fresh Ice

Fresh Ice - This clear ice is fresh water that has broken off from a glacier and is now a small chunk being eroded by the waves. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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About to Fall

About to Fall - A caving about to break off from a glacier. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Rhapsody in Blue

Rhapsody in Blue - Layers of eroding ice berg. - Photo by Rachel Lea Fox
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Circling back to the ship, we de-geared long enough to have a relaxed lunch and catch our breath before heading out just over an hour later for our first steps on the continent proper, and a bit of fun...

Read the next chapter: Day 2: Snow Day


Table of Contents:

Introduction: Telling the Story posted Jan 10, 2009

Day 0: Positioning posted Jan 12, 2009

Leaving, on a jet plane posted Jan 12, 2009

Day 1: The Herc posted Jan 15, 2009

Day 1: Penguino posted Jan 16, 2009

Day 2: Chicken posted Jan 17, 2009

» Day 2: Leopard posted Jan 19, 2009

Day 2: Snow Day posted Jan 22, 2009

Day 2: Shipwreck posted Jan 26, 2009

Day 2: Totally Tabular posted Jan 27, 2009

Day 3: Gentoo Cute posted Jan 29, 2009

Day 3: Lichen Shag Glacier posted Feb 3, 2009

Day 3: Palmer Station Visit posted Feb 9, 2009

Day 4: Icy Penguins posted Feb 11, 2009

Day 4: Adelie Awesome posted Feb 15, 2009

Day 4: Leopard Seal Attack posted Feb 17, 2009

Day 4: Kayak posted Feb 19, 2009

Day 4: Vernadsky Station Visit posted Feb 23, 2009

Day 4: Vernadsky Sunset posted Feb 25, 2009

Day 5: Antarctic Circle posted Feb 27, 2009

Day 5: Polar Plunge posted Mar 5, 2009

Day 5: Mouth of The Gullet posted Mar 13, 2009

Day 5: Ice Camping posted Mar 18, 2009

Day 6: Flamingos on Ice posted Mar 20, 2009

Day 6: Mountain Climbing posted Mar 24, 2009

Day 6: Ice Textures posted Mar 26, 2009

Day 6: Antarctic New Years posted Apr 2, 2009

Day 7: Crystal Sound Icebreaker posted Apr 9, 2009

Day 7: Abandoned Antarctica: Base W - Part 1 posted Apr 17, 2009

Day 7: Abandoned Antarctica: Base W - Part 2 posted Apr 21, 2009

Day 8: Bird Watching in the Fish Islands posted Apr 23, 2009

Day 8: Icee Day - Part 1 posted May 5, 2009

Day 8: Icee Day - Part 2 posted May 11, 2009

Day 9: Port Lockroy - Base A posted May 20, 2009

Bonus Chapter: Baby Penguins! posted May 21, 2009

Day 9: Antarctic Humpback Whales posted June 3, 2009

Day 9: Dallmann Butt Sliding posted June 11, 2009

Day 10: Birthday Whales posted June 23, 2009

Day 10: Hannah Point Part 1: The Birds posted July 15, 2009

Day 10: Hannah Point Part 2: Elephant Seals posted July 22, 2009

Day 10: Deception Island - Part 1: Walking on the Moon posted Dec 11, 2009

Day 10: Deception Island - Part 2: The Martian Chronicles of Oz posted Dec 15, 2009

Day 11: Emperor Penguins posted Jan 8, 2010

Day 12: Black and White and Pink All Over posted Aug 4, 2011

More chapters posted every few days...



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